Thursday, November 5, 2009

Fresh Start By Doug Fields


Fresh Start by Doug Fields asks the question, do we really believe all things are possible with God? Fields espouses that the key to getting unstuck in life is cooperation with God.

I read this book like a sunbather. I read a chapter and then put it down. You know how sunbathers ease into the water slowly and eventually decide to dive in, immersing their bodies fully? That about sums up how I read this book. My start/stop/start reading did not reflect the witty and intelligent way the book was written. Fields offers practical wisdom about how to power through those inevitable times in life where getting out of bed doesn’t garner much appeal (for whatever reason). I think my jerky reading commitment had much more to do with the meaty chapters. Each chapter hits upon a takeaway lesson and I didn’t want to miss anything.

I’d heard a lot of the insight, carefully categorized in the book, during sermons or in Bible studies before, but reading it all in one comprehensive place added to the book’s value for me. I found myself drawn to the authenticity and humor Fields evoked. Even though some of his points have the potential to be hard to swallow, points encouraging conviction, accountability and a desire to grow, I never felt as though I was being beaten over the head or preached at. Instead, Fields provides comical examples from his own life experience to shed light on what growth and becoming unstuck can look like.

I enjoyed the book. I wish I’d been more concerted in my effort to read it in a shorter time span. However, because I took time to read it, I’ve discovered that certain aspects have truly stayed with me months later. In the last chapter, Fields asks, “If you knew the clock was ticking rapidly for you, what would become most important in your life?” A solid overall question to convey the kind of thinking the book inspires.

Finally, Fields writes that Psalm 90:12, “summarizes the theme of this book.” I’ll leave you with the verse. “Teach us to make the most of our time, so that we may grow in wisdom (NLT).”

Thanks to Thomas Nelson for sending along another solid book.

14 comments:

  1. I enjoyed this book as well! I think you're right...I read in short spurts as well...it was filled with lots to "think on." One of those you might re-read in order to remind yourself of the godly wisdom within it.
    With joy,
    Cherie

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  2. You have peaked my interest - I will have to check that book out very soon! :)

    Thanks for another great idea!

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  3. “If you knew the clock was ticking rapidly for you, what would become most important in your life?” Awesome question to really think about! :O)

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  4. This sounds like a great book. I enjoy reading books that give life application through biblical principles.

    The clock is ticking!

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  5. Sounds really cool! I don't read a lot of nonfiction, but this sounds like a great book.

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  6. That ticking clock always sends me running to hug my daughter. :-)

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  7. I've been planning on getting that one. Someone let my mom borrow it and she has raved about it.

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  8. For me, it depends on the writing style of the book. Some books have me plowin' through like I'm a mad professor, and others that are written in deep, languid tones have me taking one thought at a time and chewing on it.

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  9. Sounds like a good read. Maybe one you have to read more than once to fully "get"?

    I like the verse Mr. Fields used. I try to remember each day that my days are numbered and are coming to an end. I don't know the date but God does and I don't want to miss any of what He has planned. Wisdom...bring it on!

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  10. Cherie, Certainly lots to think on, and on and on...

    Lauren, You are welcome. It fed me.

    Diane, I thought so. It was one of the things about the book to really grab me. I adore questions.

    Tamika, I like a book like you described from time to time as well.

    Kristen, I thought he was funny. Funny earns points with me.

    Rosslyn, I imagine she soaks up every single one.

    Susan, Your mom sounds cool in my book.

    Deborah, Good point about writing style. I think it didn't help I was reading five other books at the same time.

    Christina, You go by the Carpe Diem model also. Good stuff to live by.

    I'm thrilled to have started Betsy Lerner's, The Forest for the Trees. I'm going to take my time with it. Books like this are like Werthers Originals...they take awhile, but it's good the whole time (unlike gum).

    Hope the night brings joy. His mercies are new every morning and I didn't just hear that from a little bird. Like Prego (or is it Ragu)...it's in there.

    Enough from me.
    See your thoughts at the One Question Friday.
    ~ Wendy

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  11. i love the way you described how you read it: like a sunbather. that's how i read more "meatier" non-fiction books. :) this one sounds like a solid one for growth.

    jeannie
    The Character Therapist

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  12. I pretty much read every book the way you have read this one, fits and starts. And although there are times when I really wish I could read faster, I do feel that because I read books the way I do, I retain more (hopefully!). Thanks for the great review of Fresh Start. I really liked the theme behind it.

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  13. Thanks Wendy for leading me to this book. I enjoy inspirational books that teach more on developing a stronger relationship with God.

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  14. "Our moments shouldn’t be regarded as more of the mundane, but as opportunities to grasp a little more of heaven and a little less of earth." That's a quote from Billy Coffey's blog that I just read. Then, I came over here and read Psalm 90:12. I'm thinking I'm getting a clear message that I need to live in each moment as it comes. Wow! I'll definitely be pondering that as I go through my day today. Thanks for a great post, Wendy!

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