Wednesday, July 1, 2009

The Skydiver And The Beekeeper

Help or hurt, save or fail…it doesn’t matter how you put it, there are certain jobs or roles in life that require something specific that will either save the person of interest or fail them, help them or hurt them. I believe this is also true of words.

The words we choose and use can either be glorifying or condemning in any given circumstance. The beauty is WE have a choice. We get to decide how we will use our words. And depending on how we use them, we will eventually grasp the truth that our words reflect what’s inside us—who we are.


I’ve come up with some job descriptions and items readily associated with those jobs that symbolize the effect that words can have, with that save or fail mentality…

  • The carabineer for the rock climber
  • Receipts for the banker
  • Netting for the beekeeper
  • A parachute for the skydiver
  • Good soil for the farmer
  • Bible for a pastor
  • Windex for the dad in My Big Fat Greek Wedding (just checking to see if you’re paying attention)
  • Sturdy platform for the window cleaner
  • Scalpel for the surgeon (although I did see a desperate time on Grey’s Anatomy years ago, where an electric screwdriver was used…hmmm)
  • Imagination or creativity for the writer


Of course the concept of “saving” applies with varying degrees, but you see where I’m headed with this. Our words can mean the difference between sinking and swimming. Not only is it important that we use selective verbalization (see yesterday’s post) for the sake of others, but it’s also imperative we are wise with our words for our own sake. We want to watch our words so that we’re sure to represent ourselves in an authentic and glorifying light.


What other jobs or roles can you think of that depict the relationship and importance words have?







*photos by flickr

15 comments:

  1. I'd say Bible for the Christian writer as well. Mine is constantly referred to when writing.

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  2. paper for the writer -- fabric for the quilter (that's me!) -- bow for the violinist (me again) -- taster for the cook (my husband is my taster!) :)

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  3. curriculum for the teacher.
    pallet jack for the delivery guy

    These are fun. :)

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  4. My husband is a Soldier and words are HUGE to them. Give the wrong command and people get hurt or die. Interpret words wrong and you can have the same outcome.

    But I also think we, as the receivers of words, need to be slow to comprehend what is said to us. How often do we hear something and take offense without examining what we heard?

    Flack jacket (bullet proof jacket) for the Service member

    Gifts of the Spirit for the Mother, friend, sister etc.

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  5. I like this Wendy. Words are important. Let's see: pencil for the student?

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  6. Wendy: Wonderful post! Fabulous analogies.
    I think words are like arrows in the hand of a warrior. They can stop the enemy of our souls in his tracks if applied rightly.

    I once had the Holy Spirit tell me that my career/ministry would not move forward like I wanted it to until I learned to curb my negative words. Wow!

    Jen

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  7. Bucket for the berry picker (just seeing if you're awake!) Thanks for these thoughtful posts this week! You always get my brain turning! :)

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  8. I got sidetracked when you said Grey's Anatomy--my favorite show--nice to see someone else likes it-- I love their plots!

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  9. Such a thoughtful post! Words are so powerful. It's awesome that as writers we can have such a powerful influence with them but we also need to use them responsibly.

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  10. Computer for the blogger ;)
    Reader for the writer.

    Great word thoughts here, what an intricate way of communication, where so much can hinge on one word.

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  11. My brain is a little sleep deprived, so I'm just enjoying what you and other's have written here. Joanne beat me to the blogger one. LOL I'd maybe add faith for the Christian. Can't leave home without it.

    Hugs,

    ~Shaye

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  12. Spell check for the writer, brakes for the car, prodding of the Holy Spirit for our lives and the grace of our Savior who saved us.

    Good thinking, has to be a good article in this, or a short story for sure!

    blessings*

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  13. Book for the reader, spirit for the faithful, healing for the doctor

    I absolutely love how you are able to get me to think outside of my own box. Thanks

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  14. Eileen, I agree. I love to incorporate even concepts from it in my fiction work.

    Lauren, I try to quilt too...hear the word try.

    Katie, learned a new term: pallet jack.

    Andrea, two great points. I've never thought how important words must be to a Soldier. Also, how important it is to sift words as they come at you.

    Jill, especially when taking a scantron test. :D

    Jeanette, I love how you describe the Spirit as telling you that, like you guys were just hanging out talking. :D

    Jody, I love to turn brains. :D Paying attention. A bucket is helpful indeed.

    Terri, I was watching it a lot during that one show where they used the screwdriver...wigged me out a bit. I liked how they had Izzy bake when she was sad.

    Cindy, I'm with you: words = powerful.

    Joanne, I like how you wrote hinge...great word for what I've been thinking about words lately.

    Momma Miller, I guess you could leave home without it, but you'd land in a scary place then, perhaps.

    Karen, thanks for the blessings. I think it could turn into an article.

    Doodles, I like inspiring you to think outside your own box. The view from any of our boxes can't be as good inside as when we are out of them.

    See you all back here tomorrow. Same time, same place. :D

    ~ Wendy

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  15. I love these. Maybe patience for parents,
    Pocket protector for the engineer( had to say it, my husband is one:) )

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